Archive for July, 2013

“Legally Blonde, The Musical” Is What It Is- Fast And Furious Comedy With That Special Stages-St. Louis Touch

July 26, 2013
The great opening number, "Omigod You Guys" gets "Legally Blonde-The Musical" off on the right foot at Stages-St. Louis.

The great opening number, “Omigod You Guys” gets “Legally Blonde-The Musical” off on the right foot at Stages-St. Louis. Photo: Peter Wochniak

You can’t help but laugh along with the wonderous Elle Woods and her assault on Harvard Law- all in the name of love. The fact that love takes a funny turn as well is what this musical is all about. And Stages-St. Louis brings their magic touch to “Legally Blonde-The Musical” to make sure the audience is entertained at break-neck speed through two and a half hours.

The score is almost a pleasant after-thought (it is a musical, after all) but that music isn’t going to win any awards. The fact that a lot of the songs along with the book are filled with often outrageous humor about a preppy who shows that she has brains as well, makes the show sustainable and just a lot of fun. Michelle London wows us with her hesitant approach to having the chops to get into and succeed in law school while maintaining her almost “valley girl” (is that term still relevant?) life style. She sings, she dances and she absolutely charms us with her winning smile and winning ways.

The versatile Ben Nordstrom tries to get rid of the "Chip On My Shoulder" with the ladies of the chorus in "Legally Blonde" at Stages-St. Louis.

The versatile Ben Nordstrom tries to get rid of the “Chip On My Shoulder” with the ladies of the chorus in “Legally Blonde” at Stages-St. Louis. Photo: Peter Wochniak

Everyone’s favorite Stages musical comedy man, Ben Nordstrom, returns to St. Louis to take on the role of professor’s assistant and eventual love interest, Emmett Forrest. He dazzles again with his versatility- be it juggling baker or leading man- with a smooth charm and a stage presence that draws your attention no matter how many are on stage with him. Equally adept on the musical comedy stage is another favorite, David Schmittou who commands respect and a little too much more as Professor Callahan.

Heather Jane Rolff as Paulette sings to Michelle London as Elle about her dreams of "Ireland" at Stages-St. Louis production of "Legally Blonde."

Heather Jane Rolff as Paulette sings to Michelle London as Elle about her dreams of “Ireland” at Stages-St. Louis production of “Legally Blonde.” Photo: Peter Wochniak

Coming thisclose to stealing the show is Heather Jane Rolff as the hair dresser, Paulette. Besides giving invaluable advice to Elle and finding and winning the man of her dreams in the form of UPS delivery man, played with proper swagger by Scott Guthrie, she belts out a powerful “Ireland” in the first act and delights with the wonderful “Bend and Snap” number in the second act. Besides, she has Rufus, the bulldog who manages to outshine Elle’s chihuahua Bruiser- not an easy task.

Brandon Davidson makes a most dramatic entrance as Elle’s boyfriend Warner and continues to vacillate between her and his new “snooty” Harvard girlfriend. Nicolette Hart is convincing (despite the horribly oversized wig) as Brooke, the video weight loss guru who is on trial for murdering her elderly husband- Elle’s masterful first case. She leads the chorus in one of the most spirited and energetic ¬†songs of the evening, “Whipped Into Shape” which includes precision-like mastery of jump ropes.

Michelle London as Elle delivers her valedictorian speech at the close of "Legally Blonde-The Musical" at Stages-St. Louis.

Michelle London as Elle delivers her valedictorian speech at the close of “Legally Blonde-The Musical” at Stages-St. Louis. Photo: Peter Wochniak

Michael Hamilton’s direction is spot-on with an emphasis on high energy and laughs. Rusty Mowery has recreated the original Jerry Mitchell choreography- again with a spirit apropos to the high-octane atmosphere of the young cast. Originally produced by our town’s Fox Theatricals, the book, based on a novel and then the popular film of the same name is silly but effective and the music and lyrics by Laurence O’Keefe and Nell Benjamin won’t have you humming the songs after the show but fit very well into the script.

And, of course, the usual supporting cast and chorus energy level into the stratosphere helps move the show along at a great clip and squeezes every ounce of “comedy” out of this musical comedy. Hardest working cast in show biz and they bring it all to “Legally Blonde.” And a mention as well to the clever and colorful block set design of James Wolk, the lights of Matthew McCarthy and wonderful costumes of Lou Bird.

Catch “Legally Blonde-The Musical” at Stages through August 18th. Give the box office a call at 314-821-2407 and get tickets now for this evening of fun and escape. As usual, you’ll have a great time.

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St. Louis Shakespeare Gets “Timon Of Athens” Out Of The Way- Now Let’s Move On

July 22, 2013

Scan_July-22-2013-1-03-34-985-PM“Timon Of Athens,” currently playing at St. Louis Shakespeare Company, doesn’t look, feel or sound like a play by William Shakespeare. Despite a noble cast and solid direction by Milt Zoth, it shows a weakness unlike any other play by the Bard. The premise is a bit iffy and the language does not flow and just doesn’t ring true. It’s a shame because the hard working cast really gives it their all and some excellent performances shine through.

Timon, generous to a fault, shares his wealth with his friends until it really starts to catch up with him and his debts increase. When he returns to said friends for a helping hand, he is categorically denied and decides to take what is left of his dignity and retire to a cave in solitude. All visitors- even those with regret and asking for forgiveness, are soundly rebuked. When Athens decides to reinstate him to his former glory, it is too late and a somber city mourns.

Michael Brightman is a powerful and convincing Timon though he tends to get a bit too fierce and overbearing in the second act. Chris LaBanca and Patty Ulrich do nice work as two of the “fair weather” friends as does Carl Overly. Nicole Angeli is a stalwart steward and delivers some of the more “Shakespearean” lines from the play. While Maggie Murphy also shines as the cynical Apemanta. Cameron Ulrich also does nice work as the captain who lends help to the utmost to try to make up for his earlier treatment of Timon.

Scan_July-22-2013-1-37-09-354-PMRounding out the cast are Don McClendon, Kim Sansone, Betsy Bowman and Alyssa Ward in multiple roles. A very nice set design by Pippin McGowen and strong lights by Steve Miller make the play look great and the choice for modern dress (suits and ties for Senators and cocktail dresses for the ladies) works well enough thanks to the work of Michele Friedman Siler.

In other words, everything works but the play itself. It almost sounded like a school project where the teacher tells the class to write a play in the mode of Shakespeare. It has some of the essentials of his work but lacks the power and the drive of his better known tragedies. We’ll get another chance to view a lesser know Shakespeare work with St. Louis Shakespeare’s next production of “The Two Noble Kinsmen.”

Contact the St. Louis Shakespeare Company at 314-361-5664 for tickets or more information. “Timon Of Athens” runs through July 28th at the Hunter Theatre at DeSmet High School.

LaBute New Theater Festival- Part II- At STLAS Becomes “LaBute Lite”

July 20, 2013
Paul Cooper cowers before park ranger David Wassilak in "Blood Brothers." Photo: John Lamb

Paul Cooper cowers before park ranger David Wassilak in “Blood Brothers” at the LaBute Theater Festival Photo: John Lamb

After suicides, revenge killings and Irishmen digging their own graves in the first set of one-acts in the LaBute New Theater Festival, the second go round offers a lighter fare but with some of the same cutting edge perception by the playwrights. There’s even a bit of the naughty with some kinky moves, some over the top technology while even the more serious plays feature much more humor than we had in Part I.

Local talent, Rachel Fenton, has been quite busy in this whole series. In Part II, she is in two of the plays and has written the opener. “Blood Brothers” is the name of the play and a fictional TV series at the crux of the show. Park ranger Hank, played by David Wassilak, has, on an impulse, kidnapped and bound and gagged his favorite star from the series who he spots jogging in the park. Taking him back to his rustic cabin (one of the perks of the job), he pours out his heart to the star, played by Paul Cooper. It all comes around to heroes- real and imagined- and their value and worth in today’s society. Wayne Salomon has directed with the proper mix of tension and obvious humor laced through the script. A really nice job by the young Rachel Fenton.

David Wassilak gives advice to Tom Lehmann in "Cut" at the LaBute Theater Festival. Photo: John Lamb

David Wassilak gives advice to Tom Lehmann in “Cut” at the LaBute Theater Festival. Photo: John Lamb

The second play is a repeat of the Neil LaBute contribution to the festival, “The Possible.” Again, Ms. Fenton and the marvelous Wendy Greenwood spar over a stolen boyfriend, suppressed feeling and urges and how love can come in unexpected packages. Milt Zoth directs with a real feel for LaBute’s mastery of plot and dialogue.

To end the first series of plays, we’re presented with “Cut” by Daniel Damiano who had his world premiere full length play, “Day Of The Dog” at St. Louis Actors’ Studio earlier this year. This is a fascinating character study of Jerry, a prisoner of thirty years who has become the prison barber and his current client, prisoner Raymond. As Jerry, David Wassilak is also the prison philosopher offering advice to Ray, played by Tom Lehmann. He says we’re all driven by three things- greed, desperation and rage- and tries to convince Ray what path he should take to get out of the penitentiary as soon as possible. We get an insight into both men’s lives and are left with the idea that Jerry’s philosophy hasn’t gone over well with his fellow prisoners. Rep Artistic Director, Steve Woolf, reveals this little slice-of-life story well to the audience and gives us just a glimpse- a fascinating one- into these two lives.

Nathan Bush and Laura Sexauer discuss their next move in "Kink" at STLAS. Photo: John Lamb

Nathan Bush and Laura Sexauer discuss their next move in “Kink” at STLAS. Photo: John Lamb

After the intermission, it’s time for “late night LaBute” as the plays get a little racier and a great deal funnier. “Kink,” by Joshua Thomas, brings Laura Sexauer as Francesca and Nathan Bush as Simon into a hotel room obviously trying to outdo each other in the sexual role-playing game. Everything from Mexican pool boy to bunny and fox (and a lot more) are brought up or acted out to the seeming displeasure of one or the other of the participants. Francesca finally convinces Simon that she will really get turned on by his reading of “The Shipping News.” I may have to re-read that one, because I don’t remember it bringing on any “50 Shades of Grey” moments. Frustration and very little satisfaction seems to be the result of the evening’s games, however and director Milt Zoth has played it mostly for laughs. There’s not a lot to it, but it’s a fun little play and one that really seemed to hit home with the audience.

Aaron Orion Baker and Rachel Fenton practice "safe cyber sex" in "Present Tense" at the LaBute Theater Festival at STLAS. Photo: John Lamb

Aaron Orion Baker and Rachel Fenton practice “safe cyber sex” in “Present Tense” at the LaBute Theater Festival at STLAS. Photo: John Lamb

Closing out the evening is “Present Tense” by Peter Grandbois and Nancy Bell. Technology reaches into the world of sexual misconduct as two cheating marrieds try to communicate and get pleasured through texts, tweets and other means through I-pads and laptops. Are they actually together since they never actually touch but just talk about the ways they are pleasuring each other even when they’re standing or laying in bed two inches apart from each other? The “climax” appears to come with the somewhat surprise ending. Rachel Fenton returns as Debra and Aaron Orion Baker is Walter. Wayne Salomon returns to direct this little commentary on how technology has entered every aspect of our lives including our sexual peccadillos. Does infidelity include texts and tweets? You bet it does and “Present Tense” brings it all to the forefront.

This has really been fun- watching the excitement of new plays and- in some cases- new playwrights parade before our eyes and the audiences have been appreciative. One constant throughout the festival has been tremendous work by all the actors and the amazing versatility of set designer Jim Burwinkel’s rotating walls. And kudos to all the playwrights for being chosen to be a part of this festival which will be back next summer as well. Be sure to call St. Louis Actors’ Studio at 314-458-2978 or contact them at http://www.stlas.org for tickets or more information on the LaBute New Theater Festival- Part II. It runs through July 28th at the Gaslight Theatre.

A Solid And Sordid “Little Shop Of Horrors” Closes Stray Dog’s Tenth Season

July 20, 2013
Chiffon, Crystal and Ronnette assist Seymour in discovering the deep, dark secret of Audrey Two in Stray Dog's "Little Shop Of Horrors." Photo: John Lamb

Chiffon, Crystal and Ronnette assist Seymour in discovering the deep, dark secrets of Audrey Two in Stray Dog’s “Little Shop Of Horrors.” Photo: John Lamb

From the squalor of Skid Row we once again learn the valuable lesson- “don’t feed the plants”- as Stray Dog Theatre brings the popular “Little Shop Of Horrors” to their stage in a clever and well-sung production. This closes their highly successful 10th season and everything about this company keeps getting better and better.

Stray Dog regular, Ben Watts, was born to play Seymour Krelborn- the hapless hero who toils away at Mushnik’s Florist until he stumbles on a remarkable plant that appears to be a one-of-a-kind. Naming it after the secret love of his life- fellow flower shop minion, Audrey- the plant, Audrey Two, develops a strange appetite and it’s not for plant food. Watts uses a high pitched whine and equally glass-shattering singing voice as the perfect take for Seymour and makes him all the more lovable as he struggles with the plant, his longing for Audrey and the sudden success that the plant brings him as it grows into a behemoth over two acts.

 

Lindsey Jones, Christopher R. Brenner and Ben Watts prepare for the shop opening in "Little Shop Of Horrors" at Stray Dog Theatre. Photo: John Lamb

Lindsey Jones, Christopher R. Brenner and Ben Watts prepare for the shop opening in “Little Shop Of Horrors” at Stray Dog Theatre. Photo: John Lamb

Lindsey Jones gives a knock out performance as Audrey. She has the Skid Row twang as well and a sweet, powerful singing voice. From the ridiculously hilarious “Somewhere That’s Green” to the belting duet with Ben Watts on “Suddenly, Seymour,” she shows why she doesn’t really need the head mike. Keith Thompson keeps popping up in the strangest places- as a wino who “dramatically” urinates on a wall to the elderly Chinese man who sells the plant to Seymour to a sleazy agent. But his best role of the night is the sadistic dentist boyfriend of Audrey. As Orin Scrivella, DDS, he graphically relates how he was “born” to be a dentist and later uses the Black & Decker method of drilling teeth on Seymour. It’s another perfect, over the top performance that keeps the audience (fortunately) and Audrey (unfortunately) in stitches.

Ben Watts and Christopher R. Brenner celebrate their new relationship as a bigger, badder Audrey Two looms in the background. Photo: John Lamb

Ben Watts and Christopher R. Brenner celebrate their new relationship as a bigger, badder Audrey Two looms in the background. Photo: John Lamb

Christopher R. Brenner is the kindly yet scheming florist who plots to keep Seymour in his employ. He adds to the comic cast and displays a nice singing voice throughout. The three member “Greek chorus” who keep things moving exposition-wise during the proceedings are simply wonderful. Jamie Lynn Marble- who also provides the clever choreography- along with Maria Bartolotta and the “ringer,” Mark Saunders, make a delightful trio who move in and out of the action and all over and above the stage to keep us informed as well as entertained.

I guess you could say the real star of the show is Audrey Two. She manipulates and powers through the special agenda to the surprise ending of “Little Shop.” The powerful voice of Jeremy Sims commands respect from Seymour and fills him full of promises of everything he’s ever wanted. And a special nod as well to Dan Jones who is the “plant operator” behind the menacing Audrey Two. A terrific supporting cast plays everything from shop customers to news reporters to media reps and offer strong voices as the singing chorus.

Keith Thompson explains the joys of being a "Dentist" to the Skid Row trio in Stray Dog's "Little Shop Of Horrors." Photo: John Lamb

Keith Thompson explains the joys of being a “Dentist” to the Skid Row trio in Stray Dog’s “Little Shop Of Horrors.” Photo: John Lamb

Director Justin Been keeps things moving in this busy little musical with the assistance of the great band led by Chris Petersen. David Blake’s scenic design is spectacular featuring a rotating flower shop as the focal point and Tyler Duenow’s lights add just the right dramatic effect. The excellent costumes of Alexandra Scibetta Quigley include the awesome Audrey Two regalia.

Some rather dark but funny themes emerge as Stray Dog finishes off this season with “Little Shop Of Horrors” and opens next season with a repeat of their “bloodiest” production to date, “Evil Dead: The Musical.” Can’t wait to continue the horror-fest. Catch “Little Shop Of Horrors” at Stray Dog Theatre through August 3rd. Come visit them at the Tower Grove Abbey and contact them at straydogtheatre.org for tickets or more information.

“Les Miserables” Dynamic Thanks To Great Casting At The Muny

July 18, 2013
Students and soldiers build up the wall in the Muny production of "Les Miserables."

Students and soldiers build up the wall in the Muny production of “Les Miserables.”

Big Broadway stars heighten the drama of the already dramatic “Les Miserables” at the Muny this week with the power of “Phantom” regular, Hugh Panaro as Jean Valjean and the rich, deep tones of “Porgy and Bess” star, Norm Lewis as his nemesis, Inspector Javert. The rest of the cast is well represented by newcomers including college students who shine as well.

Director Richard Jay-Alexander has a flair for the show and wrings every gripping moment out of a story about a man who steals a loaf of bread and then is hounded for the rest of his life by the obsessed police inspector who considers him his personal case. The wonderful music and lyrics by Claude-Michel Schonberg and Herbert Kretzmer along with the original script by Alain Boublil make this show the favorite it has been for many a year. Despite the somewhat overblown and often severely miscast movie, “Les Miserables” is truly a magnificent piece of work.

Hugh Panaro as Valjean and Norm Lewis as Javert in "Les Miserables" this week at the Muny.

Hugh Panaro as Valjean and Norm Lewis as Javert in “Les Miserables” this week at the Muny.

Charlotte Maltby also shines as Fantine with nice work as well from Lindsey Mader as Eponine, Alex Prakken as Marius, Katie Travis as Cosette and Bobby Conte Thornton as Enjolras. Michael McCormick and Tiffany Green get to have the most fun of the night as the rascally Thenardier’s. The children in the cast do well too including the brave little soldier, Gavroche as portrayed by Jimmy Coogan, the lilting voice of Lilly Kanterman as the young Cosette and Lily McDonald as the young Eponine.

The rest of the cast, as I said, is made up of the teen chorus, youth chorus and a lot of young folks making their Muny- in some cases- their professional stage debuts. It works well for this show which can handle a cast of thousands. In addition, the Muny expanded the orchestra for this show- with Kevin Stites as musical director- and the result adds to the power of this production.

The stunning and workable set design of Rob Mark Morgan and the alternating dark and light moods created by lighting designer Nathan W. Scheurer are impressive. Standing ovations on opening night (at the end of the first act and a super-swell of support at the end) were an indication of how wonderful this production is. The Muny has always attracted top notch talent over the years, but they’re really going above and beyond with some A-list Broadway stars and productions that make the most of the vast Muny stage.

You have until this Sunday, July 21st to see a marvelous production of one of the most beloved musicals ever, “Les Miserables.” See it now because you’ve got the added bonus of fans that actually work and keep the air moving during the show as well as before and at intermission. So the St. Louis heat and humidity are still here, but it’s a lot more pleasant these days as you watch a Muny show.

The Beauty Of The LaBute New Theater Festival At STLAS Is The Emphasis On “New”

July 8, 2013
Wendy Greenwood and Rachel Fenton discuss "boyfriends" in Neil LaBute's "The Possible." Photo: John Lamb

Wendy Greenwood and Rachel Fenton discuss “boyfriends” in Neil LaBute’s “The Possible.” Photo: John Lamb

For the second year in a row, famed playwright and screenwriter, Neil LaBute, has hosted a New Theater Festival at the St. Louis Actors’ Studio. This year, as in 2012, he premieres one of his new one-acts and then we’re treated to two full nights of new one-acts by new and emerging artists. Round One is taking place now and we’ve got some pretty nice work showing on stage at the Gaslight Theater.

Mr. LaBute shows why he is the master with a beautifully crafted play that leads off the first week called “The Possible.” STLAS Artistic Director, Milt Zoth, directs this clever little two person play with just the right pace for the cat and mouse game between two young ladies. One has stolen the other one’s boyfriend and soon reveals why she did it. As she builds a convincing case, misfired carnal desires suddenly take on a whole new meaning and the unexpected suddenly becomes “possible.” Two great local actresses take over the stage in Mr. LaBute’s premiere presentation- Wendy Greenwood is the aggressor who uses subtlety and skewed logic to capture her prey while Rachel Fenton plays the innocent (or is she?) milquetoast who eventually begins to see things in a different light.

Justin Ivan Brown and Jackie Manker in Carlos Perez's "Cleansing Acts." Photo: John Lamb

Justin Ivan Brown and Jackie Manker in Carlos Perez’s “Cleansing Acts.” Photo: John Lamb

Kansas City playwright, Carlos Perez, wrote the second one-act of the evening, “Cleansing Acts.” This one’s directed by Repertory Theatre of St. Louis Artistic Director, Steve Woolf, and features outstanding performances by Justin Ivan Brown, Andra Harkins and Jackie Manker. Brown, as William, is a reclusive young man who still lives with his mother. As the mother, Hawkins is a riot as she continually meddles in his life- even interrupting him in the bathroom as he prepares to get in the bathtub. Expecting his “girlfriend,” the mother balks but doesn’t seem to mind that she’ll be joining him in the bathroom. Despite constant pestering (mother even offering fresh baked cookies), the two manage to discuss and plan what’s on both of their minds before mother returns for her next excuse to interrupt. It’s a pretty stunning piece of work that may show it’s hand a bit too early, but still manages to shock the audience.

Aaron Orion Baker and Tom Lehman in "Pinky Swear" by Tyler Vickers. Photo: John Lamb

Aaron Orion Baker and Tom Lehman in “Pinky Swear” by Tyler Vickers. Photo: John Lamb

After a brief intermission, we have three longer one-acts which opens with Tyler Vickers’ “Pinky Swear.” Mr. Vickers is a Missouri native who currently works in Los Angeles. Told in several scenes presented in reverse order, “Pinky Swear” takes us on a journey of infidelity and mistrust. This one’s directed by the Black Rep’s Linda Kennedy (who returns to her role in the Black Rep production of “The Wiz” later this month in an extended run). Aaron Orion Baker- supposedly tied up in a bag and hoisted above stage as the play opens- has betrayed his friend, played by Tom Lehman, who goes through a manic and often hilarious soliloquy during the first scene. As we trace the story backwards, we see what led to this moment. Once we’re familiar with this approach, it’s a bit long but ultimately satisfying play.

An allegory by Brooklyn playwright and arts

Wendy Greenwood and Suki Peters discuss philosophy in Alexis Clements'  "The Elephant In The Room." Photo: John Lamb

Wendy Greenwood and Suki Peters discuss philosophy in Alexis Clements’ “The Elephant In The Room.” Photo: John Lamb

journalist, Alexis Clements called “The Elephant In The Room” follows. Again directed by Linda Kennedy, it manifests the oft-heard phrase in the form of the wonderful Suki Peters. Her facial expressions, mannerisms and a very pachydermian attitude are a delight. Wendy Greenwood returns as her adversary, confidante or perhaps something else. Managing to command the stage shared with an elephant is a remarkable feat and she is up to it. Perhaps a bit of trimming is needed in this one as well as a lot of the same ground seems to be covered. These two fine actresses, however, keep it interesting throughout.

Nathan Bush in the compelling "Two Irishmen Are Digging A Ditch" by GD Kimble. Photo: John Lamb

Nathan Bush in the compelling “Two Irishmen Are Digging A Ditch” by GD Kimble. Photo: John Lamb

Steve Woolf returns to direct the final one-act of this first series in the LaBute New Theater Festival, “Two Irishmen Are Digging A Ditch” by G.D. Kimble. He’s an actor, playwright and director who has worked all over the country but now resides in New York. It’s played in two scenes, both involving death and a joke about two Irishmen digging a ditch. In the first one, a naked and exposed Nathan Bush awaits the firing squad and manages to wax philosophic as he faces his accusers. In the second scene, Justin Ivan Brown and Aaron Orion Baker return as a man literally digging his own grave and the man who decides his fate. Though both scenes are raw and visceral, the joke of the title seems to make a bizarre statement about finality and perception. Director Woolf manages to squeeze every bit of irony and meaning out of this well written script.

Neil LaBute surrounded by the High School Finalists on the first Saturday of the Festival. Photo: John Lamb

Neil LaBute surrounded by the High School Finalists on the first Saturday of the Festival. Photo: John Lamb

As part of this wonderful month long celebration of the one act play and new works was a high school finalists stage readings of works by high schoolers with local professional actors reading their scripts. Those finalists included Aidan Murphy, Laura Townsend, Annie Kopp, Laurel Button and Amanda Ehrmann.

The clever set and lighting design of Jim Burwinkel let’s all of the plays and scenes within the plays work with a smooth precision. And kudos to Founder and Producing Director of St. Louis Actors’ Studio, William Roth, for putting this massive undertaking together along with his festival selection team: Neil LaBute, Milt Zoth, Wayne Solomon, Bobby Miller, Linda Kennedy, Elizabeth Helman, Edward Scott Ibur, John Pierson and Patrick Huber.

You have one more week-end to see these series of one-acts and then on the 19th, Neil LaBute’s premiere of “The Possible” will play once again with four more new one-act plays by new or established playwrights. Give St. Louis Actors’ Studio a call at 314-458-2978 for tickets or more information.