“Boeing, Boeing” At Dramatic License Brings Back Comedies Of The Silly ’60’s

 

John Reidy, Emily Baker, Chad Morris and Deanna Mazdra try to sort out the complications of "Boeing, Boeing" at Dramatic License Productions. Photo: John Lamb

John Reidy, Emily Baker, Chad Morris and Natasha Toro try to sort out the complications of “Boeing, Boeing” at Dramatic License Productions. Photo: John Lamb

Recently revived on Broadway, “Boeing, Boeing” is a throw-back to the bedroom farces of the 1960’s that kept the Barn and Plantation Dinner Theatre in business in our town for some time. Silly to be sure and perhaps a bit longer than need be, but in the hands of the great team at Dramatic License Productions, it’s well worth seeing. The incredible cast makes these larger-than-life characters appealing as they just have fun with the somewhat dated material.

They keep it set in the 1060’s which allows for the “politically incorrect” dialogue and situations and makes the play what it is- a sexual romp with a playboy, his friend, a sassy maid and three airline hostesses. Need I say more? Playwright Marc Camoletti sets up an impossible situation and somehow manages to make it all end well. DLP director, Brad Schwartz plays it to the hilt and gets great comedic performances from all of his actors. And a sold out house on the night I saw it could not have been more appreciative.

John Reidy, Kim Furlow, Chad Morris and Deanna Mazdra deep in the throes of confusion in the Dramatic License Production of "Boeing, Boeing." Photo: John Lamb

John Reidy, Kim Furlow, Chad Morris and Deanna Mazdra deep in the throes of confusion in the Dramatic License Production of “Boeing, Boeing.” Photo: John Lamb

Chad Morris is the bon vivant who has the obviously spacious apartment overlooking Paris where he has three stewardesses on the hook. He has an elaborate airline schedule that intersects the three different airlines they all fly for so that as soon as one leaves after a day or two layover with him, the next one flies into Orly to spend some time with him. Of course, all three believe they are engaged to him. Chad plays the role with a suave demeanor which increases to sheer panic as supersonic jets soon change the schedules all around.

Enter John Reidy- his old buddy- who marvels at his friends chutzpah but warns him of the dangerous game he is playing. He also travels neatly into panic mode as he tries to help his friend as all three ladies descend on the apartment at the same time. Playing a game of hide and seek as he keeps one lady in one room, a second in another room and yet another out for a walk, his nerves begin to ravel and some unexpected advances leads to the first solution to his friend’s problem.

Emily Baker tries to explain the situation to John Reidy in "Boeing, Boeing" at DLP. Photo: John Lamb

Emily Baker tries to explain the situation to John Reidy in “Boeing, Boeing” at DLP. Photo: John Lamb

DLP’s Executive Producer, Kim Furlow, is simply marvelous as the maid who assists in keeping the ladies in line and away from each other. She obviously does not approve of the shenanigans going on but feels obligated to her boss to calm the ever growing tempest in the teapot brewing at full boil. Her rolling eyes and exquisite timing in both movement and delivering her sarcastic lines is priceless.

Then we have the girls. The brilliant Emily Baker ties us up in gales of laughter with her heavy German accent and drill sergeant tactics. Deanna Mazdra has the Texas twang down perfect as she takes her feminist views to the nth degree in trying to tame both men. Finally, Natasha Toro uses her feminine wiles to win out the “playboy” sweepstakes.

John Reidy tries to protect one bedroom while Chad Morris directs Deanna Mazdra to another room in "Boeing, Boeing" at Dramatic License. Photo: John Lamb

John Reidy tries to protect one bedroom while Chad Morris directs Deanna Mazdra to another room in “Boeing, Boeing” at Dramatic License. Photo: John Lamb

When the action is fast and furious, that’s when “Boeing, Boeing” becomes the clever farce that won it accolades in the ’60’s and once again with the recent revival. Rough and tumble seduction and the typical slamming doors make for a wild and wooly ride through sexual escapades that somehow all wind up satisfying in a “Love, American Style” style of sappiness. But that’s what makes this show so appealing- the retro set of ¬†inappropriate actions and dialogue that one couldn’t write today. But as a piece of nostalgia, it’s wonderful.

Join the madcap fun through March 17th as Dramatic License Productions presents “Boeing, Boeing” at their theatre in Chesterfield Mall. Give them a call at 636-220-7012 or visit at dramaticlicenseproductions.org for tickets or more information.

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